A D V E R T I S E M E N T
  • My Info

    Headquarters:

    San Francisco, California
    United States

    Sports:

    Skateboarding

  • About

    The Root


    In the early 90's, an inspired group of skaters strayed away from the norm of the masses in skateboarding.
    This group took an approach out of left field, creating a soft goods company using only organic cotton and hemp blends for shirts and pants.
    This company was called Half Life Organics. The company (co-founded by professional skateboarder, Matt Field)
    was backed by some of the greatest riders street skating has seen. Riders included Huf, Quim and Mike Cardona, Matt Reason,
    Ricky Oyola, Bob Burnquist, and others. This new path caught on at an early time in the skate community. However, we believe the
    masses weren't quite ready to accept eco-conscious materials into mainstream skate fashion. While the struggle continued in the effort to
    bring notoriety to the movement, other companies were later able to emerge from the path that Half Life Organics had created.



    Inception


    Similarly, when Matt Field, Michael Leon, Reese Forbes, and Nate Jones came together to start Rasa Libre
    through Deluxe in 2003, Rasa too was ahead of its time. It came together as an artistic interpretation of the three riders'
    personalities; Matt, Reese, and Nate. It was a bit of a change from the norm of riders being assimilated to a brand, since
    the brand was created rather, as a reflection of the riders. Rasa Libre to this day,thrives on the free flowing outlook
    and spirit that its riders hold on and off of a skateboard.



    Becoming Independent


    The core market received the company very well, but it was challenging to break through to the larger cultural scale.
    Rasa parted ways with Deluxe on good terms, as it was a sacrifice to source out materials and manage a company
    that had many special issues and details, like finding hemp and organic cotton at a good price. While some people may have
    let go of the dream, Matt and Tiina Field were ready to continue the brand independently, family owned, as they knew
    the revolution wasn't finished yet.



    Here, Now


    Rasa Libre is keeping that movement alive today, as we fly the new red, white, and blue: the green.
    Rasa Libre is making the effort to utilize sustainable suppliers and organic materials. Realizing that
    we cannot offer all products in these materials, we are increasingly incorporating them into our line and making
    them available to consumers who want that choice. Rasa Libre is also dedicated to sourcing manufacturing in the USA
    and providing the absolute finest quality products.

    To find out more about the sustainable Rasa Libre movement and to get involved with us in the local
    environmental movements around the Bay Area, be sure to check the website for updates and our Green Calendar.



    Why Rasa is Relevant


    The new generations coming into skateboarding must always be reminded that it's okay to push
    around and feel good and comfortable. To have fun and be inspired, without feeling any pressure
    to do the hardest tricks or biggest stairs, but to feel good about being a different breed of
    skater. All types of skating are appreciated and respected by the Rasa family.
    We feel there must be something for the people who want to feel free to explore on their skateboards in a soulful expression.

    Since its inception, Rasa Libre, has been a constant source of inspiration for many other brand personalities,
    often imitated but never duplicated. Rasa Libre, has always, and will always, pride itself on creative, quality art,
    with a loose, colorful approach. Never becoming too serious and blending a 1960's inspiration, with its own twist.
    We feel that we are again in a revolutionary time of change in the world. Now, more than ever, being environmentally
    conscious is essential, and who better to lead this crusade for sustainability than the same people
    who introduced the movement to skateboarding in the early nineties.