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Dragon Alliance’s goggle tech will blow your mind

Dragon x2 2015 GTV Gift Guide
The X2 offers the easiest lens change system you’ll ever experience. Photo: Dragon

Prior to testing the new offerings for this season from Dragon Alliance, my experience with goggles that claim to have quick change lenses was abysmal.

Too often attempting to fit replacement lenses into the track on the goggle frame with numb fingers felt like performing brain surgery with chop sticks and the results would be disastrous. The replacement lenses wouldn’t sit properly in the goggle track, causing excessive fogging and uncomfortable airflows inside the goggle.

The tech inside Dragon’s new line of goggles has completely eliminated that problem.

The NFX2 ($180) and X2 ($270) goggles offer Dragon’s patented Swiftlock Lens Change system, which makes child’s play of the normally laborious process of switching out lenses.

With a small lever on each side of the goggle, the Swiftlock system releases the lens of the goggle at the flip of a switch and allows you to lock in new lenses just as easily. With its comfortable but breathable face foam and super anti-fog treated lenses, the goggle had no issues with fog, even when paired with an old school neck gaiter.

And if you just want to avoid changing lenses altogether, the X1 ($270) goggle might be the choice for you.

Featuring Transitions lenses, the X1 lens automatically adjusts its tint levels to changing sunlight, meaning it can handle everything from the glare of a bluebird day to the dreaded flat light that can make skiing and riding unknown trails hazardous. It is, essentially, the only lens you will ever need.

The only real issue when it comes to buying a pair of goggles from Dragon for the upcoming ski/snowboard season is sizing.

Dragon NFX2 2015 GrindTV Gift Guide
Dragon’s patented Swiftlock Lens Change system on the NFX2 and x2 makes switching out your lenses incredibly easy, while Transitions lenses on the X1 model make changing lenses unnecessary. Photo: Dragon

The X1 and X2 run large. Like, really large.

And with their frameless styling, you might feel a bit like a member of Daft Punk while wearing them.

This wasn’t a problem for me given the fact that I have a head like a bowling ball, but for people with more regular-sized craniums, it might be a tad off-putting. Luckily, the NFX2 offers a more traditional style and comes in a medium fit, making it a more appealing option for most.

The Dragon X1 ($270), X2 ($270) and NFX2 goggles($180)

Find more snow goggles to give this season.

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