Tips for inspiring an adventure when you’re in a slump

Whether it’s booking a flight to a far-off locale or just loading your mountain bike onto the rack, mustering the energy (and the cash) for an adventure feel, at times, taxing.

Don’t resign yourself to an afternoon of Netflix just yet. Here are a few ideas on how to reignite the spark for getting out there when you find yourself in a slump.

Bring your gear to work

Keep your gear somewhere you can see it and grab it easily. You never know when the urge to get out might strike. Photo: Brandon Scherzberg
Keep your gear somewhere you can see it and grab it easily. You never know when the urge to get out might strike. Photo: Courtesy of Brandon Scherzberg
When you work a nine-to-five job, it’s easy to succumb to a routine that doesn’t allow much time for adventure.

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Elevate your chances of squeezing in a morning trail run or a lunch-break bike ride by packing a grab-and-go bag filled with the gear you need to make it happen. Don’t let yourself off easy with excuses: Pack essentials like a headlamp, water bottle, bag of snacks and extra socks.

Create a space to display your gear

Energy: You get what you give. Photo by Johnie Gall
Energy: You get what you give. Photo: Johnie Gall
If the old adage “out of sight, out of mind” is true, then the opposite must apply as well.

Whether it’s transforming the garage into a gear room or reorganizing a shelf in your apartment, display your gear in an easily accessible area. Seeing your helmet in a prominent place will act as a trigger, and since you can grab everything you need easily, you’ll be more inclined to follow through with an excursion.

Borrow a guidebook

A guide book, map, or a bit of beta on what's getting the fish to bite can inspire you to get out. Photo by Brandon Scherzberg
A guidebook, map or a bit of beta on what’s getting the fish to bite can inspire you to get out. Photo: Courtesy of Brandon Scherzberg
If you’re just feeling burnt out by the same trails and climbs you’ve explored all year, it could be time to branch out.

RELATED: Making the case for playing hooky

A new setting can elicit an entirely new experience and renewed perspective, so fill up the gas tank and borrow maps or guidebooks from friends, then reserve a weekend to check out these new locations.

Browse Instagram or Snapchat

A photo posted by GrindTV (@grindtv) on

Even if you’re not active on social media, Instagram and Snapchat can be invaluable tools when it comes time to plan a new trip.

Follow new accounts (ahem, like @GrindTV) and search applicable hashtags (explore tags tailored to your region or favorite activity).

RELATED: 5 inspiring outdoor photographers you need to follow on Instagram

Interact with other users to weed out the best trails or little-known travel tips. A particularly good photo may even clue you into a trip you never knew you wanted to take.

Invest in a new piece of gear (or borrow one)

Borrowing gear from a friend opens up new avenues of exploration you may not have had access to before. Just don't forget to return the favor. Photo: Johnie Gall
Borrowing gear from a friend opens up new avenues of exploration you may not have had access to before. Just don’t forget to return the favor. Photo: Johnie Gall
Dropping cash on a piece of gear offers two levels of motivation: Firstly, investing in gear means not using it actually puts you at a financial loss. Secondly, you’ll feel more qualified to try something new if you have the right equipment to do so.

RELATED: How to know when it's time to replace your beloved outdoor gear

New gear doesn’t mean buying new, either; try app marketplaces like OfferUp or VarageSale to buy and sell used gear locally. If you’re really short on cash, just borrow a boat, rod, harness or helmet from a friend. Just don’t forget to return the favor.