Your go-to guide to eating seasonally

Food trends can be fickle creatures. One minute, juicing is the big thing, then it’s cutting out gluten.

But, what really makes sense for our bodies, and the environment?

Eating seasonally is good for the environment as well as your wallet. Photo: Courtesy of Joanna Kosinska/Unsplash
Eating seasonally is good for the environment as well as your wallet. Photo: Courtesy of Joanna Kosinska/Unsplash

Although it is by no means a new concept, eating seasonally is slowly gaining popularity.

Eating seasonally is simply consuming produce that would naturally grow at certain times of the year. It’s easier on the planet (and your wallet).

Before global transportation and advanced agriculture methods existed, people ate seasonally because they didn’t have any other options.

RELATED: These are some of our New Year's anti-resolutions

Growing fruits and vegetables year-round that don’t naturally exist in particular climates and seasons is expensive, can be harmful to the environment, and it exacerbates already damaging effects that mass agriculture can have on the planet.

Here are our tips for eating according to the calendar:

Research your area and climate

In North America, pumpkins are a great seasonal option for wintertime. Photo: Courtesy of Aaron Burden/Unsplash
In North America, pumpkins are a great seasonal option for wintertime. Photo: Courtesy of Aaron Burden/Unsplash
Different areas have different climates, so make sure to take that into consideration when researching seasonal eating.

For instance, winter in Southern California is not the same as winter in Maine. That being said, different fruits and veggies will grow in the same season, dependent on region.

Visit your local farmers’ market

Farmers markets and co-ops provide fresh, local produce anyone can enjoy. Photo: Courtesy of Thomas Gamstaetter/Unsplash
Farmers markets and co-ops provide fresh, local produce anyone can enjoy. Photo: Courtesy of Thomas Gamstaetter/Unsplash
Local farms and gardens do not have the funds that big agriculture have to grow what they want, when they want it.

Your local growers plant crops according to the seasons, and the farmers’ market or co-op will reflect that.

RELATED: Here are the amazing health benefits of coconut oil

Visiting your local farmers’ market will give you a broad idea of what’s in season for your region.

Another perk? The produce at farmers markets is much cheaper than your typical grocery store, saving you money.

Try not to overload yourself

Try implementing your new lifestyle slowly but surely. Photo: Courtesy of Sven Scheuermeier/Unsplash
Try implementing your new lifestyle slowly but surely. Photo: Courtesy of Sven Scheuermeier/Unsplash
Start slow. Incorporate seasonal foods into your diet one or two at a time, and get used to the change in pace.

If you absolutely love a certain food and would be miserable without it, continue to consume it (perhaps in smaller quantities).

One of the biggest downfalls when it comes to changing your diet or lifestyle is that people don’t make small changes – they completely change their lifestyle without knowing if a diet will really work for them.