Spencer Seabrooke sets death-defying slacklining world record

View from above of Spencer Seabrooke crossing a 951-foot chasm for a free solo slackline world record. Photo: Screen grab
View from above of Spencer Seabrooke crossing a 951-foot chasm for a free solo slackline world record.

Daredevil slackliner Spencer Seabrooke set a world record for the longest free solo slackline, covering 210 feet between two cliffs in Squamish, British Columbia.

Seabrooke of Vancouver, B.C., was 951 feet above ground and walked across Chief North Gully without any safety lines or nets to break the previous world record of 180 feet set by Andy Lewis in 2011, according to UPI and International Business Times.

Watch as Seabrooke makes his way across the slackline, surviving a couple of harrowing moments when he fell onto the line and held on for dear life, and forcing him to start over each time:

"This had to have been one of the most gut wrenching things I've experienced in my whole life, between operating the drone and watching him walk 290 meters above the Earth's floor, it was definitely something I have never experienced," said Zac Moxley in the description of the video he shot.

Some of the angles, especially from overhead, were insane.

Wrote one commenter on YouTube: "I got my daily cardio just watching."

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