The Big Blue Ocean Exploration

As ‘Shark Week’ looms, so might giant Megalodon

Discovery Channel releases video showing what it claims to be evidence that gigantic monster predator, thought to be extinct, still exists

Megalodon

With “Shark Week” set to begin Sunday, the Discovery Channel is suggesting that a gigantic, prehistoric shark called Megalodon still exists.

The accompanying footage is convincing to a degree, leaving viewers to wonder what else might have torn the entire tail section off a full-grown whale (first bit of evidence, Hawaii, 2009)?

A ship strike? A ship strike, followed by shark predation. Or … Megalodon?

More evidence includes a photo of a dorsal fin protruding six feet out of the water (South Africa, 2013, photo posted below). The shark-like fin belongs to a creature that was said to be attacking a whale.

“This monster is much bigger than any great white,” Discovery cautions.

Not convincing enough?

Megalodon2

The footage also shows an newly obtained photo from Nazi archives, revealing a dorsal fin and tail fin 64 feet apart, near German U-Boats (South Africa, 1942, photo is atop this post).

“The length between the dorsal fin and the tail indicates that this creature may be up to 100 feet long,” Discovery warns.

Still not scared?

Megalodon3

Also in the footage is a video clip showing a gargantuan shark-like creature swimming next to what looks like a rescue victim off Brazil in 2012. The footage is via the Brazilian Coast Guard and the predator is said to measure 60 feet.

“It was not a whale.”

Lastly, viewers are directed to a 2009 Sky News viral video, with footage from Queensland, Australia, showing a large great white shark with enormous bites to its back and midsection.

The title of the video: “Monster Shark Bites Great White in Half!!”

With that, viewers are left to wonder: Does Megalodon really exist? And if so, how could the creature have evaded capture during all these years? Is the evidence presented by Discovery doctored or manipulated?

Could any of the creatures in the footage have been whale sharks or basking sharks? They’re the two largest known shark species, but neither exceeds 40 feet and both feed on plankton.

Or is this just a bunch of hype, flimsy or contrived evidence such as that presented for years regarding the Loch Ness Monster and Bigfoot?

Probably. But it’s “Shark Week,” so what do you expect?

Here’s another Discovery video on Megalodon, in case you haven’t had enough: