• Trail Blazin'

    Trail Blazin' is an outdoor blog edited by Pete Thomas.

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    oliver theess

    oliver theess says:

    "The Surfing Program began at "Aviation High School in Redondo Beach", California, 90278. The surf team at Aviation High School , which took the championship in 1982, against Mira Costa High School in Manhattan Beach, California , 90266. We know Oliver Theess was on the championship Team. The surf was about 4 to 5 foot in Manhattan Beach. This created the program which in the South Bay schools started even way before that time. It just was reinstated. " For the KOOKS that didn't know" No Bozos."

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    chinedu_pete

    chinedu_pete says:

    "Love you FELIX...This guy even landed far too better than the pilot that flew us from Dubai to KL on july 14th 2012"

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    chinedu_pete

    chinedu_pete says:

    "Thank you God,Got juice on me MEHN"

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    msully840

    msully840 says:

    "The BAUM!"

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  • For seal pups, climbing onto a slippery surfboard is no easy task

    What happens when you moor a rain-slicked windsurfing board in an area teeming with harbor seal pups, and mount a remote camera designed to capture the pups trying to climb aboard what they obviously regard as a prime resting platform? YouTube user HydRemote tried this experiment and ended up with a very cute and amusing video. (It's a lot of the same thing viewers might want to watch until they find out if the larger spotted seal--if, in fact, it's the same animal--makes it onto the slippery board.



    The footage was captured off Puget Sound in Washington state. HydRemote, which is a company that designs cable systems for mounting cameras, stated that the clips were pulled from 30 minutes of "Slip n' Slide" footage.

    No animals were harmed, and no Vaseline was applied, according to the video description.
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  • Florida anglers liven up spring break by reeling sharks onto beach

    Thousands of sharks migrating off Florida have made headlines recently, mostly because of spectacular aerial footage showing the predators cruising through aquamarine coastal waters.

    But over the weekend a group of Palm Beach fishermen decided to take advantage of the phenomenon and themselves made the news by reeling two blacktip sharks onto a beach crowded with college students on spring break.

    Fortunately, the area in question--Midtown Beach--was one of many in the area closed to swimmers because of the great shark migration, which typically coincides with spring break.

    They probably were extra-glad to be ordered to stay out of the water after enjoying an up-close look at the sharks and their mouths full of teeth. (Blacktips measure to about eight feet and have been implicated in attacks on humans. Blacktips and spinner sharks are the predominant species in the migration.)



    Fishing on the beach is legal, so lifeguards and police did not stop the fishermen.

    "Well, they're here anyway you know. So it's not like we're attracting them," Tom Kieras, one of the fishermen, told WPTV.

    Jeremy Stanley, a lifeguard, did not appreciate the anglers reeling Jaws onto the beach, saying they could have been bit if a shark was pushed a certain way in the surf or if it lunged unexpectedly.

    Others did not appreciate that the anglers were harming the sharks, but Joshua Jorgensen, one of the anglers, said they were collecting swabs from inside the mouths of the sharks for research.

    "Some people got opinions and they can have their opinions," he said. "But the law is the law. And the law says we're allowed to be here."
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  • Angler collects $1-million paycheck for catch of world-record tuna

    Guy Yocom, who last summer made headlines by landing a world-record yellowfin tuna, now has another trophy to place on prominent display: a gigantic cardboard check paid to the sum of $1 million. The tuna, caught south of Baja California's tip on an expedition out of Cabo San Lucas, weighed 427 pounds. (Photos of tuna and check presentation, and action video are posted below.)

    Guy Yocom (holding fishing rod) smiles while posing alongside 427-pound yellowfin tuna. The catch has since been recognized as a world record and earned Yocom a check for $1 million. Image showing check presentation is posted below.)
    The catch eclipsed the existing record of 405 pounds and Yocom has since been recognized as the all-tackle record holder by the International Game Fish Association.

    But Yocom also had been registered in a promotion being offered by Mustad Hooks, which promised to pay $1 million to the first angler who sets a world record, with one of the company's hooks, before the end of last September.



    Yocom caught the behemoth on September 18. Mustad officially made good on its promise this week at Fred Hall Fishing, Tackle and Boat Show in Long Beach, California.

    Yocom and his team of anglers also used the show, which attracts tens of thousands each year, to unveil a video showing the capture of the tuna (video is posted above).

    "It was great meeting Guy, his captain Greg DiStefano, and the rest of the crew," Jeff Pierce, Mustad's sales manager, told Sport Fishing magazine. "What an incredible group of guys. Hardcore anglers and simply great people."

    Although Yocom now has a ceremonial paycheck to go along with a trophy mount and the memories the tuna battle produced, there is a catch.

    The money will be paid in $20,000 annual installments over the next 50 years, so Yocom, 55, plans to live a long time.

    It certainly has been a whirlwind several months for the angler, who can finally put the hype behind him and allow everything to sink in.

    In a phone interview from Cabo San Lucas the day after his catch, Yocom said: "I didn't realize what a big deal it was until now, because I've been getting phone calls from people I haven't heard from in a while, telling me what a big deal it is."

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    PHOTOS: Baja anglers startled as killer whales emerge just inches from boat
    PHOTOS: NASCAR legend Jimmie Johnson surfs, drives and skis on same day
    INTERVIEW: Meet Ishita Malaviya, India's first female surfer
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  • Dancing sea lions? Diver videotapes magical encounter off California

    Diving with great white sharks--hopefully from inside cages--is an adventure that many have placed on their bucket list. But how about diving with sea lions? Vimeo user Chris Aran on Wednesday uploaded footage from an expedition to Anacapa Island off Southern California, and the graceful sea lions put on a dazzling show and seem to be dancing with the music chosen by Aran. (After the first minute the sea lions give way to the amber kelp forest and its colorful fish.)



    "Loved the big animals and the kelp forest," Aran stated in the video description.

    If the edit looks professional, Aran is an East Coast writer/filmmaker who has produced or worked on several short films and other productions.

    For the "Anacapa" project he used a GoPro Hero 2 inside a dive housing and a Sola Video light while videotaping the fish. The song is "Last Fare" by Little People.

    California sea lions are gregarious and highly curious mammals, and sometimes provide magical moments such as those enjoyed by Aran.
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  • Alabama angler's monstrous striped bass is one for the record books

    An Alabama resident has reeled in a 70-pound striped bass that shattered a 54-year-old state record and could land the angler in the book of world records for the heaviest striper ever caught in a landlocked fishery.

    James R. Bramlett, 65, reeled in the behemoth on the Black Warrior River on Feb. 28.

    Bramlett told Joe Songer of AL.com that he credits his wife, Janice, for urging him to go fishing. She was scheduled to undergo a hospital procedure in a few days and would need him to be around and take care of her.

    The catch, weighed on a certified scale, exceeds the previous record, set in 1959, by 15 pounds. (Bramlett and his catch are pictured at right.)

    "It's definitely uncommon," Heath Haley, a biologist for Alabama Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries Division, told Field & Stream. "This fish certainly, in my opinion, was an anomaly. It's a very fat, chunky fish.

    "The previous record being 55 pounds, the fact that it hasn't been broken since the 1950s, it's just incredible that not only he broke it, but he shattered it. You just don't see them that big that often."

    The striper measured 45.5 inches long and boasted a girth of 37.75.

    According to Songer, the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources has already approved the catch as a state record. If approved by the International Game Fish Association it'll become a new world record (this process can take weeks or months).

    The current IGFA record for landlocked stripers is a 67-pound, 8-ounce specimen landed in 1992 in Los Banos, California.

    [Related: The biggest fish ever caught from a kayak.]

    Bramlett said he saw the huge fish roll on the surface, so he tossed a bait and soon hooked up. The battle lasted 20 minutes and as soon as Bramlett could secure the catch, he telephoned his wife to share the news about the memorable catch--and, presumably, to thank her for persuading him to spend the day fishing.

    --Image showing James R. Bramlett and his record striped bass is courtesy of AL.com/Joe Songer

    More on GrindTV
    PHOTOS: Baja anglers startled as killer whales emerge just inches from boat
    PHOTOS: NASCAR legend Jimmie Johnson surfs, drives and skis on same day
    INTERVIEW: Meet Ishita Malaviya, India's first female surfer
    Channels: Outdoor
    Tags: None
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