Soldier saves woman from pond with alligators

Nathan Currie, the soldier who rescued a woman trapped in her submerged car, points to the area where the incident occurred in Holbrook Pond. Photo courtesy of the U.S. Army

Nathan Currie, the soldier who rescued a woman trapped in her submerged car, points to the area where the incident occurred in Holbrook Pond. Photo courtesy of the U.S. Army

An Army solider sprung into action last week to save a woman who had inexplicably driven her sedan into a pond infested by alligators and snakes in Fort Stewart, Georgia.

Pfc. Nathan Currie, a U.S. Army explosive ordnance disposal technician, was fishing Holbrook Pond for the first time when he heard a splash and saw the car, according to Walter T. Ham IV of 20th CBRNE Command Public Affairs.

Currie, 28, dropped his fishing rod on the dock and drove around the pond to where the vehicle was upside down with only its tires above water. Currie dove into the water to see if anyone was in the car. After feeling a body in the backseat, he resurfaced for air and dove back down and extracted a woman from the car.

soldier

Nathan Currie, the soldier who made the rescue. Photo courtesy of the U.S. Army

Currie immediately began CPR on the woman, who had been under the water for about five minutes and was turning blue. But Currie resuscitated the woman and stayed with her until paramedics arrived on the scene.

While Currie administered CPR, Command Sgt. Maj. Wylie Hutchison arrived on the scene and dove into the pond to ensure nobody else was inside the car.

Ham told GrindTV Outdoor in an email Tuesday that the woman, who was not identified, was OK at the scene after being revived by CPR. She was later transported to a Savannah, Georgia, hospital for testing.

"My Army training helped by preparing me to respond quickly and take action with courage and confidence under adverse conditions," Currie told Ham.

Currie chose the life-saving profession of explosive ordnance disposal because he wanted a job that was "challenging and very rewarding."

His actions at Holbrook Pond were what one would expect from every trooper in the 20th CBRNE Command.

"He is part of a team that lives each moment of every day in service to others, a team of soldiers who continually prepare themselves through tough realistic training and then they execute with little or no thought regarding their own safety," Command Sgt. Maj. Harold E. Dunn IV said. "They drive themselves each day just a little further knowing they will, not could, be called to the front to clear the path for others to travel.

"His actions, although extraordinary for most, are not surprising. We are all very proud of how he stepped forward when called without hesitation.”

Little did Currie know alligators and snakes would be among the hazards of the job.

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