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Surf explorer helps discover new evidence about Amelia Earhart crash

The History Channel is touting a documentary airing July 9 that claims new evidence has been discovered that helps solve the mysterious 1937 disappearance of Amelia Earhart, navigator Fred Noonan and their plane.

Most notably is the unearthing of a photo from the National Archives. The photo was shot in the Marshall Islands, and it includes a man and a woman who have a striking resemblance to Earhart and Noonan.

The documentary, entitled “Amelia Earhart: The Lost Evidence”, airs this Sunday and supposedly provides resounding claims that the photo is un-doctored and real, with analysis from facial recognition experts supporting that it is Noonan and Earhart in the photo, and even new pieces of her plane, the Electra, having been found.

The theory the documentary is claiming is that Earhart and Noonan went down near the Marshall Islands and were captured by the Japanese. This taking place during World War II, the duo were held captive and treated as U.S. spies. They were then transferred to the nearby island of Saipan and held as prisoners, eventually dying.

While there are certainly bits and pieces of this theory that have popped up over the years (Marshall Islands locals have long claimed that the plane crashed there and Earhart’s fourth cousin has perpetually pushed the theory that she was captured by the Japanese), it does leave room for uncertainty.

Another fascinating bit of information is the fact that one of the team members that found pieces of the Electra is none other than notable surf explorer Martin Daly.

Daly is one of the most important surf explorers in the Indian Ocean, having come across the Mentawai Islands in 1983.

He discovered most of the world-class waves there and kept them secret until the 1990s. He then headed the infamous Indie Traders fleet, The Crossing and held a majority stake in the Mentawai Islands surf charter industry. Daly recently shared the Earhart discoveries on Facebook:

Claiming in the post, “I found the first ever piece of her plane whilst helping out Dick Spink!” it’s clear that Daly has played an important part in these new Earhart discoveries.

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