3 To The Beach 3-7

The 2001 NSSA Western Championships
A tale of two Danes.

Over the weekend of June 18-20, the 2001 NSSA Western Championships showcased over 400 leading surfers from the NSSA’s Southwest and Gold Coast conferences. Despite the overhead south-swell conditions at Huntington Beach Pier that seemed out of control at times, competitors toughed it out in their bid to qualify for the 2001 NSSA National Championships held at Lowers June 24-30. As always, a new group of young stars arose, and this year’s flavor was in the form of Dane Johnson and Dane Reynolds.

Seventeen-year-old Johnson of Carlsbad, California regained the winning form that earned him five straight early-season victories and two conference titles by taking the win in the Open Mens over Mission Viejo’s Matt King. Johnson proved he’s back on track-winning all of his heats, including a unanimous judges’ first-place decision in the final.

“I was very thankful to come out on top in those conditions, especially since I haven’t had a win in a while,” said Dane. “I tried to do strong maneuvers on the outside and connect to the inside. As luck would have it, I got good-shaped waves.” Dane will go into the nationals as the number-one seed. “This contest definitely gave me a workout for the nationals,” said Dane. “This victory is a confidence booster.”

California’s other famous Dane, fifteen-year-old Dane Reynolds of Ventura, successfully defended his 2000 Western title in an exciting and close finals battle with Patrick Gudauskas. Dane R. posted two solid wave scores in the 7.0 range. Patrick, however, pulled off one of the most thrilling rides of the championships-a screaming double-overhead barreling left that earned near-perfect 9.0 scores from the judges. He was the sole double champion of the event by claiming the win in the Explorer Juniors, which makes a total of four career Western titles.

The following are the results:
Open Men
1. Dane Johnson
2. Matt King
3. Andrew Gahan
4. Ian Rotgans
5. Greg Long
6. Max Hoshino

Open Juniors
1. Dane Reynolds
2. Patrick Gudauskas
3. Julian Mullins
4. Travis Mellem
5. Jimmy Herrick
6. Michael Taras

Open Boys
1. Colin Schildhauer
2. Kellen Ellison
3. Logan Strook
4. Chris Friesen
5. Matt Mohagen
6. Cory Arrambide

Open Mini Groms
1. Kyle Kennelly
2. Brent Savage
3. Tyler Getzkow
4. Ford Archbold
5. Dane Zaun
6. Stephen Lonich

Open Women
1. Holly Beck
2. Anastasia Ashley
3. Jessica Oswald
4. Anna Garaway
5. Karlene Wiegand
6. Erin Meyers

Explorer Men
1. Shaun Ward
2. Ian Rotgans
3. Bart Templeman
4. Jeff Hurley
5. Todd Hutton
6. Brandon Long

Explorer Juniors
1. Dane Reynolds
2. Greg Long
3. Che Stang
4. Jimmy Herrick
5. Mike Klein
6. Nathaniel Curran

Explorer Boys
1. Alex Gray
2. Jensen Hassett
3. Kory LaPoint
4. Kilian Garland
5. Chad Compton
6. Daniel Jacobs

Explorer Menehune
1. Kellen Ellison
2. Colin Schildhauer
3. Matt Mohagen
4. Cory Arrambide
5. Matt Calderon
6. Chris Friesen

Explorer Women
1. Anastasia Ashley
2. Karin Moran
3. Holly Beck
4. Lisbeth Vindas
5. Erin Meyers
6. Amber Puha

Western Air-Show Championships
1. Josh Montgomery
2. Andrew Gahan
3. Shaun Ward
4. Brandon Guilmette
5. Rodger Eales
6. Travis Mellem

The PSTA Hits Oceanside
Too bad the waves didn’t.

The second event of the PSTA season got under way May 29-June 3 in Oceanside, California, and the timing couldn’t have been worse. Catching the end of a two-week flat spell, competitors in the early rounds were living the quintessential contest nightmare known as knee-high waves. Despite that, the talent level was high and culminated on the final d with slightly better surf and an all-star final of Pat O’Connell, Jeff Deffenbaugh, Tim Curran, and Dean Randazzo.In the final, O’Connell scored early with a 9.25 and never looked back, pulling together a total score of 23.75-his first contest win since 1999. Claiming he’s surfing better than ever, O’Connell accredited one thing to the win-his shaper. “Timmy made me a special little board,” said O’Connell of his shaper Timmy Patterson. “It’s a five-seven-it’s really small, just something completely different. The waves have been small for a couple days, and I said, ‘Hey, why don’t you make me one of those little fun ones?’ He busted this out, and I was literally sanding it before my first heat, right before I paddled out. It really sort of flowed and gave me confidence. It made it fun when competing in these kinds of waves isn’t.”-A.C.

Men’s Shortboard Final
1. Pat O’Connell 23.75
2. Jeff Deffenbaugh 19.25
3. Tim Curran 18.65
4. Dean Randazzo 18.10

2001 Billabong Pro Teahupoo, Tahiti
Cory Lopez defeats C.J. Hobgood and leads ASP ratings.

World number-fourteen Cory Lopez defeated fellow Floridian C.J. Hobgood to win the Billabong Pro Teahupoo event. By amassing the day’s highest points, he earned his first WCT victory, collected 30,000 dollars in prize money, and jumped to the top of the current ASP ratings. Conditions at Teahupoo remained four to five feet throughout the day, with strong wind and rain squalls occasionally affecting the otherwise perfectly hollow waves. Competition commenced with round four, ran through the quarter- and semifinals, and climaxed during the 2001 grand finale.Twenty-four-year-old Lopez began the 35-minute final playing catch-up. After allowing Hobgood to catch the first good wave despite holding priority, Cory was immediately under pressure when his close friend was awarded a near-perfect nine-point ride. He answered back with three consecutive high scores, however, and then dominated the rest of the final. A last-minute effort from Hobgood narrowed the gap, but it proved too little too late. Having made a name for himself at Teahupoo during the 1999 tournament by committing himself to one of the deadliest waves ever attempted, this performance further vindicated Lopez’s legend at the infamous reef break in Tahiti. He overcame Kalani Robb first up, then Shane Powell in the quarters, before ending the run of Flavio Padaratz to reach his first final since 1998. After claiming the title, he was clearly in disbelief.”It doesn’t even feel real yet,” began Lopez on the media boat, with a cold Tahitian Hinano beer in hand. “It’s like a dream. A one-day whirlwind that started in the ninth place round, and then I made the final and won. I can’t believe it. I’ve been waiting five years for a victory and finally got one. I’m stoked, especially here at Teahupoo, as it’s got the most prestige, right up there with Pipeline.”Taking the ratings lead is a first for me, but it’s only the second event of the year, and we have six more to go,” he said of his newfound position. “I hope I can keep on a roll and hold it out. There’s a ways to go, so we’ll seehow it goes through Brazil, J-Bay, and Europe. It might make me focus a little more to do some stretches and pre-psych for the events. I’m psyched and ready to go.”

Official Results Of The 2001 Billabong Pro Teahupoo
1. Cory Lopez
2. C.J. Hobgood
3. (tie) Mark Occhilupo
Flavio Padaratz
5. (tie) Joca Junior
Guilherme Herdy
Richie Lovett
Shane Powell
TransWorld SURF
Volume 3#7
File-3ToB-T&C Airshow

Sean Moody Wins T&C Air InvitationalMore than 120 surfers aged fourteen and under came together June 2-3 for the fifth-annual T&C Surf Grom Contest held at Queen’s in Waikiki on O’ahu in Hawai’i. During the contest, competitors also got to check out a dozen of hottest up-and-coming Hawai’ian pros at the T&C/TransWorld SURF Air Invitational. Last year, Dustin Cuizon took first place with a cash prize of 2,500 dollars for best air. This year’s event invited surfers such as Cuizon, Fred Pattachia, Macy Mullen, Joel Centeio, Zach Reinhardt, Flea Virostko, Kaupena Miranda, Sean Moody, and Kekoa Bacalso to compete for a total cash prize of 4,000 dollars. While the surf was limited to soft, one-to-two-foot right-hand peelers, sunny skies and warm Hawai’ian weather brought a ton of spectators out to check out the action. In the T&C/TransWorld SURF Air Invivational, Brain Pacheco, Macy Mullen, and Joel Centeio managed to chop hop their way into fourth, third, and second place, respectively. It was Sean Moody’s above-the-lip air reverse, however, that gave the young Hawai’ian first place and the 2,500-dollar check. But even the surfers who didn’t win left with something as Dave Skedeleski of Surfco Hawaii continued his tradition of giving out free nose guards and ding repair kits to competitors. In fact, every competitor who entered left with prizes. According to T&C marketing representative Lani Isherwood, “The Grom contest was a great event that helped the youth gain confidence and develop their surfing skills to better prepare themselves for the next level, where the competition gets fierce.” Indeed, the entire vibe of the contest was laid back-with more smiles than competative vibes or frowns-and helped to showca se the next wave of Hawai’ian surfers rising through the ranks.-Jamey Stone

nsWorld SURF Air Invitational. Last year, Dustin Cuizon took first place with a cash prize of 2,500 dollars for best air. This year’s event invited surfers such as Cuizon, Fred Pattachia, Macy Mullen, Joel Centeio, Zach Reinhardt, Flea Virostko, Kaupena Miranda, Sean Moody, and Kekoa Bacalso to compete for a total cash prize of 4,000 dollars. While the surf was limited to soft, one-to-two-foot right-hand peelers, sunny skies and warm Hawai’ian weather brought a ton of spectators out to check out the action. In the T&C/TransWorld SURF Air Invivational, Brain Pacheco, Macy Mullen, and Joel Centeio managed to chop hop their way into fourth, third, and second place, respectively. It was Sean Moody’s above-the-lip air reverse, however, that gave the young Hawai’ian first place and the 2,500-dollar check. But even the surfers who didn’t win left with something as Dave Skedeleski of Surfco Hawaii continued his tradition of giving out free nose guards and ding repair kits to competitors. In fact, every competitor who entered left with prizes. According to T&C marketing representative Lani Isherwood, “The Grom contest was a great event that helped the youth gain confidence and develop their surfing skills to better prepare themselves for the next level, where the competition gets fierce.” Indeed, the entire vibe of the contest was laid back-with more smiles than competative vibes or frowns-and helped to showca se the next wave of Hawai’ian surfers rising through the ranks.-Jamey Stone