SAVE TRESTLES … Meeting Thursday Night To Decide The Fate Of SoCal’s Greatest Wave

Surfrider Foundation Needs Your Voice

WHEN:
The Department of Parks and Recreation State Park and Recreation Commission will hold a meeting on Thursday, November 3 at 7 pm to allow presentations and public testimony with consideration of the proposed toll road to extend the “Foothill South Highway 241 toll road in Southern Orange County.

WHERE:
San Clemente Community Center, 100 North Calle Seville, San Clemente, CA. Directions: South Hwy 5 exit Palizada. Turn left on El Camino Real. Right onto Del Mar. North Hwy 5 exit Presidio. Turn left under freeway. Turn right onto El Camino Real. Left onto Del Mar.

AT ISSUE…

The proposed Foothill Transportation Corridor South (FTC-South) is a sixteen-mile long toll road highway that if constructed, threatens the world-class surf break at Trestles and surrounding waves (Uppers, Church, Cottons). The project would also result in the obliteration of Southern California’s last remaining pristine coastal watershed and substantially degrade habitat that is critical for the survival of at least seven endangered species, including the Southern Steelhead trout.

HOW WILL THIS AFFECT THE SURFING EXPERIENCE?

Wave Degradation

This project would require substantial grading of the terrain and millions of yards of hard reinforcement (steel, concrete and other materials), that will alter the natural sediment flow through San Mateo Creek,, which supplies sand to the Trestles surf breaks.

According to the Transportation Corridor Agency’s own engineering consultants, losses in sedimentation flow would cause “substantial degradation to surfing resources, which will likely result in significant degradation to the wave quality at Lower Trestles and nearby breaks (including Uppers, Middles, Cottons and Church).

Water Quality

A recent scientific report demonstrates that when over 10 percent of a watershed is paved there are significant water quality and ecosystem impacts.

Similar projects have resulted in generating significant increases of oils, heavy metals and other toxins. Given the proximity of the project to the watershed, this project would result in a decrease of water quality for Trestles and the surrounding breaks.

The TCA’s assertion that they can mitigate for this run-off is dubious. The initial mitigation systems that were installed on the nearby RT73 Toll Road failed, and had to be replaced at tax-payer expense. All mitigation efforts are ineffective during large rain events.

Environmental Damage from the Toll Road

The walk in at Trestles is half the experience. The area is home to numerous native plant and animal species, including several endangered species. This area would be profoundly impacted by such a massive project essentially cutting the San Mateo Creek watershed in half.

The FTC-South will run directly through San Onofre Beach State Park, a 2028.8-acre park and one of the last large coastal open spaces in Southern California.

Significant direct or indirect impacts to park wetlands, public access and visual resources. The FTC-South will essentially destroy the 5th most visited California State Parks.

THE PROJECT DOESN’T MAKE SENSE TO BEGIN WITH…

It Provides No Traffic Relief

TCA claims that the FTC-South will provide relief of traffic congestion along Interstate 5 in fact contradict their own FTC-South traffic projections that rely on cannibalizing San Diego County bound traffic from the I-15 and feeding that Inland Empire traffic to the I-5 via the toll roads.

FTC-South would be built through undeveloped land, which would promote development, and ultimately bring forth new traffic from urbanization.

FTC-South will increase, not decrease traffic on the 1-5 stretch in south San Clemente where the proposed toll road will merge with 1-5, which is already at over-capacity along this stretch. Northern San Diego County will also be affected by potentiallsevere increases in traffic congestion.

Expense

The FTC-South is expected to cost close to $1 billion (nearly $53 million a mile). Currently the plan is to fund the project by non-recourse bonds, as well as development impact fees that are already being added to real estate sales in Southern Orange County.

Contrary to TCA claims, these projects are NOT SELF FUNDED! According to an October 10, 2005 article in the Orange County Register, the nearby RT73 Toll Road is “financially struggling and “faces not being able to make its debt payments in about nine years. — need to explain how this burden will get shifted to the public.

SUPPORT THE SURFRIDER FOUNDATION IN ITS FIGHT TO SAVE TRESTLES!

The dramatic decreases in water quality, degradation to the wave quality at Trestles, destruction of the San Onofre State Beach Park and some of the last open space in Southern California, and harm to endangered and threatened species are costs not worth the questionable benefits of this extremely expensive toll road.

Surfers, swimmers and other ocean enthusiasts enjoy the waters and waves of Trestles year round. There is no other place like it in California or the world. Among Southern Californian surfers, the Trestles breaks are known as “The Yosemite of Surfing.” It is a very special place. Please join us to speak out for Trestles so we can preserve it for our children and our future,

For more information please visit Surfrider.org.

WHAT: Surfrider Foundation invites the public to speak out and join them in their fight to save Trestles and stop the proposed extension of the 241 Foothill-South toll road. Although the Transportation Corridor Agencies (TCA) claims the toll road’s impact to surfing resources at Trestles and San Onofre State Beach will be negligible, this isn’t the case. According to the TCA’s own engineering consultants, if constructed as planned the toll road, may cause substantial degradation to the breaks at Trestles (including Uppers, Lowers, Middles, Cottons and Church). The proposed toll road project will run directly through San Mateo Creek, which is one of the last remaining undeveloped coastal watersheds in Southern California. This will inevitably result in dramatic decreases in water quality throughout the area, and alter the sediment flow, which will likely result in significant degradation to the wave quality at Trestles and nearby breaks.

Surfers, swimmers and other ocean enthusiasts enjoy the waters and waves of Trestles year round. There is no other place like it in California or the world. Among Southern Californian surfers, the Trestles breaks are known as “The Yosemite of Surfing.” It is a very special place. Please join us to speak out for Trestles so we can preserve it for our children and our future.

WHEN:
The Department of Parks and Recreation State Park and Recreation Commission will hold a meeting on Thursday, November 3 at 7 pm to allow presentations and public testimony with consideration of the proposed toll road to extend the “Foothill South Highway 241 toll road in Southern Orange County.

WHERE:
San Clemente Community Center, 100 North Calle Seville, San Clemente, CA. Directions: South Hwy 5 exit Palizada. Turn left on El Camino Real. Right onto Del Mar. North Hwy 5 exit Presidio. Turn left under freeway. Turn right onto El Camino Real. Left onto Del Mar.

WHO:
Surfrider Foundation and other ocean enthusiasts. Surfrider Foundation will be hosting guest speakers outside the event as well.

WHY:
To Speak out for Trestles and stop the toll road.

About Surfrider Foundation
The Surfrider Foundation is a non-profit grassroots organization dedicated to the protection and preservation of our world’s oceans, waves and beaches. Founded in 1984 by a handful of visionary surfers, the Surfrider Foundation now maintains over 45,000 members and 60 chapters across the United States and Puerto Rico, with international affiliates in Australia, Europe, Japan and Brazil.

CONTACT:
Kim Peterson
Phone: (949) 300-5546
Email: kpeterson@surfrider.org

pters across the United States and Puerto Rico, with international affiliates in Australia, Europe, Japan and Brazil.

CONTACT:
Kim Peterson
Phone: (949) 300-5546
Email: kpeterson@surfrider.org