Shapers-Cino Magallanes 4.3

Cino MagallanesAge: 53Home: Sunset Beach, O’ahuLabel: Town and CountryYear first shaped board: 1970Teamriders: Kahea Hart, Dustin Cuizon, Jason Shibata, Kieran Perrow, Mick LoweBoards shaped per year: 1,000Favorite tool: Soft-pad sander

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“I started way back in the longboard days when longboards were just turning into shortboards-when Nat Young won the world title and he was on a shorter board,” says Cino. “We stripped longboards and reshaped them. Then I started doing boards for my cousins and brothers, practicing. It started as a hobby and turned into more serious shaping.”Influences: Cino credits North Shore heroes and shaping legends for a lot of his influences. People like Hawai’ian Tiger Espere who shaped back in the early 70s with Country surfboards in Hale’iwa. His next influences were Gerry Lopez, Reno Abelleiro, and Allan Byrnes from Australia-a shaper known for his work with channels, “He used to live on the West Side, and I used to watch him shape,” says Cino.Design Philosophy: In a world of complex bottom contours, Cino keeps things simple by worrying only about one main thing-the rocker (the bend in the bottom of the board from nose to tail). “The main thing I try to perfect is the rocker,” says Cino. “Everything else can be a little off-the rails can be off and the thickness, but if you have the right rocker, it’ll work.” Technical Specifics: “I would think just keeping a consistent rocker flow in it-always having a good entry and a good exit or waterflow.” Cino likes to go to shops in California and Hawai’i, checking out different shapes. According to him, sometimes you can tell if a shaper really rushed the board out by the way the rocker has a flat spot-just a big break in the curve. It doesn’t have a flow.Future Outlook: “I think glassing’s gonna improve for sure-keeping the boards light but more durable,” he says. “Computer shaping as well, because the DSD Digital Shaping Machine can design another perfect shape. If a surfer brings it a board in, they can scan it, record it on a disk, and then just shape it. It wouldn’t be perfect, but it would be as close as possible to a perfect copy of a board.”