May Makboard Mishap

Courtesy of Makboard

The May issue of Transworld Business preshipment just arrived at our office and we're all super stoked on how it came together, except for one glaring error. Unfortunately, our edit process missed the fact that on the snow news page a 9010 snowboard is shown with a story about Makboard, a Tahoe based company making the industry's first fully recyclable board. We would like to apologize to our readers and the fine people at Makboard and 9010 for this slip.

We'd also like to take this opportunity to re-run the story here. With the appropriate pictures.

Makboard Introduces the First Fully Recyclable Board

After 15 years of tinkering with designs and materials to help eliminate the waste and impacts of building and disposing of boards, Lake Tahoe snowboarder and inventor Bob Candler is bringing the first fully recyclable snowboard to the market. Made in the U.S.A., entirely of a clear, super strong polycarbonate substance called Makrolon, the board is designed to "carve, slash, and surf the mountain."
"It's way different than a wood core board," says Bailey Goldberg, of Tait's Boardshop in Squaw, who has ridden the board four or five times. "It's really good in powder for slashing and throwing up rooster tails and floats really well." Goldberg said he wasn't a big fan on hardpack but was definitely stoked to have the Makboard in his quiver for powder and slush days.
"I had a desire to create a snowboard that gave me more of a watery, surf like feeling," says Candler. "I also wanted to shape a board like surfboards are shaped. I needed a material that would give me strength, flex, and beauty. I wanted to try some design ideas that standard construction wouldn’t allow. Not only did I want a new design made out of a very durable material, I wanted it to also be recyclable. A recyclable snowboard isn’t going to save the planet but it’s a reminder that we need to do all we can now with everything we make to reduce our carbon footprint."
For more information check out www.Makboard.com.
Courtesy of Makboard