An outdoor lover’s guide to New York

There are many options for city climbing in New York. Photo by Joshua Petska/Wikimedia Commons
There are many options for city climbing in New York. Photo by Joshua Petska/Wikimedia Commons

A lot of New York residents can’t imagine living anywhere else. Luckily for the outdoors minded of them, there are options for adventures, outside of dodging crowds and running after taxis. This is why stop four of GrindTV’s urban road trip series, which tells you how to get outside when you’re in an urban area, is the Big Apple. Go Yankees.

Climb: Central Park

There are, according to a guidebook published last summer, 300 bouldering routes in Manhattan alone. In Central park, hit Umpire Rock, in the southwest corner of the park. Unofficially renamed Rat Rock by climbers for its four-legged visitors, it has VO, V1, and V2 traverses, and a highball V3. It can get crowded, but for city climbing it’s a solid, diverse option.

Road bike: The perimeter of Manhattan

Biking across Manhattan, amid the aggressive taxis and city drivers, can be a scary charge, but if you stick to the edges you get a 32-mile ride around the island along the Manhattan Waterfront Greenway. There are a few connector streets, but for the most part it’s on car-free bike paths. The section along the East River, where you ride past the Chelsea Pier, is particularly nice.

Biking New York; photo by Global Jet/Flickr
Biking New York; photo by Global Jet/Flickr

Mountain bike: Wolfe’s Pond Park

Staten Island’s Wolfe’s Pond Park holds the first legal mountain biking trails in New York. The trail system is relatively short, but it has both smooth beginner-friendly trails, and more technical cross-country riding. There are also trails in Queens, at Cunningham Park, as well as dirt jumps and a pump track at Hybridge Park in Manhattan.

There are many paddling options in New York. Photo by Charles Smith
There are many paddling options in New York. Photo by Charles Smith/Flickr

Paddle: NYC Water Trail

Sometimes it’s easy to forget that New York is surrounded by water, but one of the best ways to see the city is by boat. The New York City Water Trail encompasses 160 miles of waterways, from the Bronx River to the beaches and tidal marshes of Staten Island. Every Borough has paddling options and there are a ton of places, including the Harlem Pier south, where you can rent boats.

Trail Run: Inwood Hill Park

Running around Central Park is better for people watching than it is for actual running. Inwood Hill, on the northern tip of Manhattan, feels a little bit like wilderness in the city. It’s often empty, and the network of trails is windy and unmarked, so, at least at first, it’s probably a good idea to run with a buddy. You can also link it up with Fort Tyron and the Cloisters.

More city guides on GrindTV

An outdoor lover’s guide to Boston

An outdoor lover’s guide to Denver

An outdoor lover’s guide to Seattle

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