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Bizarre and rarely seen jellyfish captured in ROV video

A bizarre and rarely seen deep-sea jellyfish known as a Stygiomedusa gigantea was captured in video at 3,330 feet.
The jellyfish known as a Stygiomedusa gigantea is believed to be one of the largest invertebrates of the deep. Photo: Screen grab

A bizarre and rarely seen deep-sea jellyfish was captured on video from a remotely operated vehicle at 3,330 feet in the Gulf of Mexico.

Phillip Trudeau, who works as a surveyor for oil companies, filmed the alien-looking sea creature from the Ulmaridae family and posted it on YouTube:

"We're never getting in a submarine again," Trudeau said, according to KHOU.

The jellyfish with the scientific name of Stygiomedusa Gigantea features an umbrella-shaped bell that measures up to three-feet wide and four flat arms that stretch up to 20 feet long and sort of look like living room drapes drifting in the current.

The Stygiomedusa Gigantea is believed to be one of the largest predators among deep-sea invertebrates, according to UPI. The jellyfish species has been seen about 115 times since first being discovered around 1900.

The Stygiomedusa Gigantea is said to be widespread throughout the world, having been observed and filmed off the Pacific Coast of the U.S., off the coast of Japan and in the Gulf of Mexico.

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