Diver risks losing arm by touching great white shark on nose

A diver dangerously leans out of a shark cage to touch the nose of a great white shark at Guadalupe Island.
A diver dangerously leans out of a shark cage to touch the nose of a great white shark at Guadalupe Island. Photo: Courtesy of Dmitry Vasyanovich
One of the rules of shark cage diving is when you are tempted to reach out and touch a great white shark swimming by, don't do it. Divers are explicitly instructed to keep hands, arms, cameras — everything — inside the shark cage.

Obviously, not everyone follows the rules.

Dmitry Vasyanovich, 47, from Moscow, Russia, captured the moment a fellow diver dangerously leaned out of a shark cage at Guadalupe Island, Mexico, and touched a massive great white shark on the nose, risking losing his arm if not his life.

Vasyanovich shared photos with Caters News that show the divers using chunks of bait to lure the great white sharks closer to the cage.

Three divers in a shark cage use chunks of bait to lure in a great white shark.
Three divers in a shark cage use chunks of bait to lure in a great white shark. Photo: Courtesy of Dmitry Vasyanovich
A great white shark is lured to the cage by a chunk of bait.
A great white shark takes a bite out of the chunk of bait. Photo: Courtesy of Dmitry Vasyanovich
A great white shark takes a bite of the chunk of bait.
The diver comes face-to-face with a great white shark. Photo: Courtesy of Dmitry Vasyanovich

At one point, the diver's upper torso was outside the cage, a definite no-no in shark cage diving.

On its website, Guadalupe Great White Sharks states what is expected of divers:

“Mexican park regulations require that you stay within the cages at all times including keeping your arms, hands and cameras inside. Feeding the sharks and the use of camera strobes and lights is strictly prohibited.”

Vasyanovich told Caters News that it was a “specially organized diving safari to observe.” We can only assume that the “diving safari” was one of several shark cage diving operations at Guadalupe Island, a popular spot for viewing great white sharks.

“Of course we knew that this fish is quite dangerous, but everything was organized perfectly so we actually felt safe,” Vasyanovich told Caters News.

“It is really hard to explain and describe the feelings. When you see this huge but gracious fish you are overwhelmed with the emotions and totally forget about its frightening and thrilling danger.

“If I had a chance I would definitely go and see these great sharks again,” he said.

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