Do sharks hold hands? No, but try telling that to Tiger Beach regulars Emma and Hook

Photo showing Emma and Hook crossing fins at Tiger Beach is courtesy of ©Daniel Botelho

Photo showing Emma and Hook crossing fins at Tiger Beach is courtesy of ©Daniel Botelho

Emma and Hook, among the more popular sharks of Tiger Beach in the Bahamas, are not an item as far as anyone can tell.

But photojournalist Daniel Botelho has captured an image showing the two apex predators crossing fins, looking as though they’re holding hands.

Tiger Beach is one of the world’s premier destinations for divers to experience close encounters with tiger sharks, lemon sharks, and reef sharks.

Local dive masters feed the sharks on a regular basis, so they know when dinner is being served.

But to capture an image like this is no easy task. Many have tried and failed, and it was among the goals of Botelho, whose images have been featured by National Geographic and Disney.

[Related: How to avoid sharks while kayak fishing.]

“It looks like they are holding hands, but in fact they approached me side by side, and I’ve been waiting for this composition for years already,” Botelho said. “Every time I go there I try, but it’s very rare to have the two sharks by the side and crossing fins.”

Botelho was at Tiger Beach conducting a workshop for photographers and videographers. Another of his projects was to capture the “shark bite anatomy.” Click here to view that story and Botelho’s larger-than-life imagery.

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