How to get your best night’s sleep, so you can get after it tomorrow

As any active person knows, a good night’s sleep is imperative to a successful workout or outdoor activity.

If you’re having trouble getting the shut-eye you need, there may be some culprits affecting your snoozing you haven’t thought of yet.

Check our tips for a great night’s sleep, and wake up tomorrow feeling better than ever.

Set a schedule and stick to it

Once you start getting up at the same time every day, you won't want to stop. Photo: Courtesy of Sanah Suvarna/Unsplash

Once you start getting up at the same time every day, you won’t want to stop. Photo: Courtesy of Sanah Suvarna/Unsplash

Although sleeping in seems to feel good over the weekend, crawling out of bed at 10 a.m. two days a week and then subsequently switching right back to your 6 a.m. alarm Monday through Friday can wreak havoc on your body.

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Try going to bed around the same time every night, and setting a consistent alarm for the mornings that you’ll stick to. Your body craves routine, and your quality of sleep will increase the longer you stick to a set sleep schedule.

Turn off your screens an hour before bed

Keep that screen off and your mind rested for a good night's sleep. Photo: Courtesy of Gabriel Beaudry/Unsplash

Keep that screen off and your mind rested for a good night’s sleep. Photo: Courtesy of Gabriel Beaudry/Unsplash

For most of us, a typical evening ends falling asleep either watching a TV show or scrolling through social media until we pass out.

All of this screen time has an adverse effect on our sleep cycles: TV and cellphone screens emit what’s called “blue light.”

Blue light tricks your brain into thinking it’s daytime. When you look at blue light-emitting devices right before you fall asleep, your sleep is disrupted because your mind thinks it is the middle of the day.

Each evening, turn all screens off an hour before your set bed time. Read a book, play with a game or puzzle, or have a conversation with a loved one. Your sleep cycle will thank you for it.

Exercise regularly

Skip hitting the snooze butotn, and climb that peak you've been daydreaming about. Photo: Courtesy of Ashley Knedler/Unsplash

Skip hitting the snooze butotn, and climb that peak you’ve been daydreaming about. Photo: Courtesy of Ashley Knedler/Unsplash

Better sleep equals better workouts. Better workouts mean you’ll sleep more deeply. See how they go hand in hand?

Exercising regularly not only releases endorphins, minimizes stress levels and promotes cardiovascular health; working out also gives you a better night’s sleep.

Watch what you eat and drink right before bed

Before you say yes to that last cocktail, consider how your sleep will be affected later. Photo: Courtesy of Dave Lastovskiy/Unsplash

Before you say yes to that last cocktail, consider how your sleep will be affected later. Photo: Courtesy of Dave Lastovskiy/Unsplash

Eating too much or too little can have an adverse effect on sleep. Weird dreams are just the beginning of side effects that food and drink can have on our sleep quality.

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Common foods that disrupt sleep include caffeine, alcohol and spicy options. If you feel your sleep is disrupted regularly, keep a food journal. You may start to notice trends in which foods keep you up at night.

Make sure you’re comfortable

The best part of sleeping? Cozy sheets and pillows, of course. Photo: Courtesy of Nomao Saeki/Unsplash

The best part of sleeping? Cozy sheets and pillows, of course. Photo: Courtesy of Nomao Saeki/Unsplash

Sleeping peacefully means creating an environment where you can get your best shut-eye.

Invest in nice pillows and a quality mattress. Sleeping soundly means being comfortable, so do your research and choose what’s comfortable for you.

Adjust lighting as well as temperature until you find what works best for you.