The camping meals of our favorite extreme athletes

It almost doesn't matter what you're cooking up, it always tastes better when you're camping. Photo: Courtesy Rachel Moore.

It almost doesn’t matter what you’re cooking up, it always tastes better when you’re camping. Photo: Courtesy of Rachel Moore

It’s been a long day. It’s been a great day. Split boarding the backcountry in search of the stash, posting up on the point waiting for the swell, or simply hiking to your favorite overlook and setting up camp.

Now the tent is up, the fire is cracking, the smell of smoke fills the surroundings and you are hungry.

We spoke with some of your favorite wanderers, adventurers and backcountry explorers to find out their favorite meals to whip up over the flames and under the stars.

Timmy Reyes, O’Neill surf xxplorer

Surf journeyman, Timmy Reyes likes to prepare meals in advance, unless the locals show up with something special for the fire. Photo: WSL/Kirstin Scholtz

Surf journeyman, Timmy Reyes likes to prepare meals in advance, unless the locals show up with something special for the fire. Photo: Courtesy of WSL/Kirstin Scholtz

Huntington Beach’s Timmy Reyes‘ passport looks like a kindergarten art project, covered with colors, stamps and scribbles from around the world.

A World Championship Tour player in his younger days who thrived on the heavier wave venues, he now spends his time traveling the world in search of serious swell and new waves … And all that time on remote stretches of coastline has made him a pretty good wilderness chef.

“I believe trying to eat healthy while being active is a must. I’m 33 years old, and not a kid anymore. While surfing and camping through a day you burn about 4,000 calories. Breakfast is fruit and nuts, mixed with coffee and honey. Lunch is almond butter snacks and lots of water, with a protein bar. Coconut water is essential, as well. Hummus dip is great for dipping vegetables. For dinner, marinated tri tip or ribs, bell peppers and other vegetables, corn tortillas, guacamole and salsa, cooked on a grill, followed with lots of beers.”

“I just really use lots of spices and rubs for the meats. Sometimes herbs. I prepare it a day or two in advanced. Especially if we are going with a bigger crew of people. Otherwise, I keep it very simple. I use a small Webber grill. They are the best. Everything else I will use a smaller camping stove with two burners for heating coffee, cooking beans or whatever we got. But the best is when the locals send some love. Gotta make friends with the locals.”

Rachel Moore, Reef adventure seeker

If food tastes better by a campfire, it looks better by headlamp. Photo: Courtesy Rachel Moore.

If food tastes better by a campfire, it looks better by headlamp. Photo: Courtesy of Rachel Moore

Rachel Moore and her husband, Josh Shankle are the adventurers also known as Voyage of Agape. Whether it’s rock climbing, sailing, SCUBA or freediving, or surfing, they are constantly searching for the next adventure. Being off the grid for Moore doesn’t mean being hungry.

“My normal go-to meal that’s super easy is veggie burritos. That’s just tortillas, avocado, black beans and cheese. Sometimes we’ll do salmon on the grill and roasted bell peppers if we want to be fancy. For breakfast we’ll do pancakes. We just use a pre-made mix that you add water too, and chocolate chips!”

Joe Kinder, La Sportiva alpine climber

Joe Kinder doesn't shy away from challenging terrain, or cheffing under the stars. Photo: Javipec.

Joe Kinder doesn’t shy away from challenging terrain, or cheffing under the stars. Photo: Courtesy of Javipec

If it’s vertical and challenging, Joe Kinder wants to climb it. Known for his passion and energy, he is known for conquering numerous 9a routes, V13 boulder problems, first ascents and route development. Now a filmmaker as well, he is constantly moving. And that means feeding himself wherever climbing takes him.

“My favorite camping meal is my legendary chicken pesto pasta with broccoli. It isn’t the most simple, but it is super satisfying and wicked healthy for a climber’s needs. Lately, I have been into the gluten-free pasta. Not because I am gluten free or anything. My girlfriend is, but I am into it because it’s less filling and you can eat more without feeling like a turd. Mix it up as well, and add broccolini, toasted pine nuts or another veggie. It’s the jam!”

Marie-France Roy, Patagonia snowboarder

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Marie France-Roy, snowboarder/environmentalist/filmmaker/chef al fresco. Photo: Courtesy of Patagonia and Marie-France Roy

Ever stylish Canadian, Marie-France Roy is a marquis name in women’s snowboarding. Once a top Slopestyle competitor, she evolved into a backcountry force. Her love of the hills moved her to become deeply involved in the environment and in 2015 she was awarded the Climate Activist Award from Protect Our Winters and TransWorld SNOWboarding Magazine. Today, she splits her time between Whistler and an environmentally-minded cob home on Vancouver Island that she built herself, which means two different kind of camp meals.

“As far as summertime, bonfire scenarios, when weight isn’t an issue, I really like chocolate smoked bananas cooked on a piece of driftwood or something … so amazing. When we’re in BC, we cook stuff like simple wild salmon smoked on a stick over fire, or veggie stuffed peppers and squash. One of my favorites is wild halibut, beans and mushroom stir fry on the fire.”

Few things beat fresh salmon at the end of the day. Photo: Marie-France Roy.

Few things beat fresh salmon at the end of the day. Photo: Courtesy of Marie-France Roy

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