Whistler faces huge snowfall as Vancouver feels drought

Whistler powder

A skier enjoys some powder turns at Whistler Blackcomb. An upcoming storm could make snow much more plentiful at the mountain in the next week. Photo: Flickr user Province of British Columbia

Across British Columbia skiers and snowboarders are experiencing a tale of boom and bust, as Vancouver is facing its longest snow drought in over 25 years and mountains like Whistler are prepared for a week of monumental snowfall.

The last time British Columbia’s biggest city saw snow was on Saturday, Nov. 29, 2014, when roughly two inches fell overnight across much of the region. According to The Weather Network meteorologist Tyler Hamilton, that 368 day "snow drought" is the longest in at least 25 years.

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Ironically, while Vancouver residents have been left wondering where all the white stuff went, the local mountains of Grouse, Whistler, and Cypress all opened earlier than expected due to incredible early season conditions — conditions that could improve drastically over the next week.

Onthesnow forecast for Whistler

Whistler could be seeing a monumental week for snowfall coming up. Photo: Onthesnow

Onthesnow.com is predicting a massive 116 inches (roughly 9.5 feet) of snowfall at Whistler Blackcomb over the next eight days. To put that in context, during last year’s drought stricken ski season, the famed B.C. mountain only saw 265 inches of snow for the entire winter season.

“It’s a paradox: Vancouver hasn’t had accumulating snow in a year, but it’s having the best start to the ski season in four years,” Hamilton told The Weather Network.

Ultimately, while many have predicted that this year’s “Godzilla El Nino” could be bad for B.C. mountains, early signs point to the 2015-2016 season being one for the ages on Canada’s West Coast.

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