Hole punch cloud occurs twice in two days over B.C.

A hole punch cloud seen Monday in Southern British Columbia. Photo from Beth Gibbard's Facebook page

A hole punch cloud seen Monday in Southern British Columbia; photo from Beth Gibbard’s Facebook page

A rare cloud phenomenon called a hole punch cloud or a fallstreak hole occurred twice in two days over the southern region of British Columbia, Canada, earlier this week, stirring quite a reaction on Global BC's Facebook page—everything from "kinda creepy but beautiful" to "aliens for sure."

The first hole punch cloud was seen Sunday morning over the Lower Mainland, the second on Monday morning over Vernon.

So what is a hole punch cloud? Global meteorologist Kristi Gordon explained:

Another explanation is provided by the Cloud Appreciation Society:

Few of us like to be the first to take the plunge. We hold back at the water's edge, waiting for others to dive in. Clouds are much the same, as is demonstrated by the phenomenon of a 'fallstreak hole.'

Layers of high cloud, such as cirrocumulus or the high altocumulus, shown above, are often composed of water that is much colder than 0degC but hasn't frozen into ice crystals. When water is in the form of tiny droplets suspended in the air, it can behave rather differently from that in an ice tray in the freezer. It can stubbornly refuse to freeze, remaining as 'supercooled' liquid at temperatures of –10, –15, –20degC… None of the droplets want to be the first to freeze, and they tentatively wait as liquid, until some brave souls decide to make their move.

For reasons that are none too clear, a particular region of supercooled cloud can throw caution to the wind and decide to freeze into ice crystals that grow and fall below. A hole is left behind, and this spreads outwards as neighbouring droplets are swept up in the excitement and start freezing too.

No sooner have some droplets made the change, than they are all joining in. How appropriate, that the trail of falling crystals can look like a bird taking flight.

Several people wound up photographing the hole punch cloud and posting images on Twitter or Facebook, or on Global BC’s Facebook page. Here’s a sample:

A hole punch cloud seen Sunday. Photo by Scott Malkoske/Chilliwack posted on Global BC's Facebook page

A hole punch cloud seen Sunday; photo by Scott Malkoske/Chilliwack, posted on Global BC’s Facebook page

The Sunday morning hole punch cloud, photographed by Allison Helliker/Lower Mainland

The Sunday morning hole punch cloud, photographed by Allison Helliker/Lower Mainland

Hole punch cloud photographed by Heather B and shared on Global BC's Facebook page

Hole punch cloud photographed by Heather B. and shared on Global BC’s Facebook page

Hole punch cloud photographed by Carol James in Vernon, and shared on Global BC's Facebook page

Hole punch cloud photographed by Carol James in Vernon and shared by Global BC

Adding to the intrigue, the National Weather Service in Spokane, Washington, captured this satellite video of hole punch clouds over British Columbia:

It was unclear whether these were the same hole punch clouds or others. Either way, it's a fascinating phenomenon.

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