Big-wave surfer and Hollywood stuntman dies of cancer

Lucky to be surrounded by love.

A photo posted by Brock Little (@brock.little) on

Big-wave surfer and Hollywood stuntman Brock Little died Thursday afternoon after publicly announcing his battle with Stage IV cancer last month.

“I have cancer. It sucks, but [I’m] taking chemo. You do what [you] can,” he wrote on Instagram about two weeks ago.

“Eight weeks ago, having already taken part in the Eddie's opening ceremony, a tumor was discovered in his liver,” reported KHON2 earlier this month, on the eve of what was to be the running of the 2016 Quiksilver In Memory of Eddie Aikau big-wave contest. (The event was called off the following day due to lack of sufficient surf.)

“Several rounds of chemotherapy later and the disease spread into his bones and brain.”

Little was 48 years old.

During the 1980s and ’90s, Little was one of the best-paid and most-recognized big-wave surfers.

He acted in Pearl Harbor, Tropic Thunder and In God’s Hands and was nominated for a Screen Actors Guild award for his work in Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen.

RELATED: Meet the surfers who’ve doubled as Hollywood’s best stuntmen

His 1990 appearance in the Quiksilver In Memory of Eddie Aikau invitational earned him second place.

After Little announced he was battling cancer, friends and fellow pro surfers rallied around him. Kelly Slater said the world won’t be the same without Little.

Little was also a writer, publishing more than 30 articles in both SURFER and SURFING, according to SURFER.

Little grew up on the famed North Shore of Oahu in Haleiwa. His brother, Clark Little, is a renowned photographer known for his beautiful shorebreak photos.

He said he would miss his brother, who was also his hero.

My brother,my hero, the one I looked up to all my life, passed away today. Love you Brock.

A photo posted by clark little (@clarklittle) on

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